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CHRISTINE ORTOLL CHARITY

OUR MISSION

We are committed to creating media about mental health and substance use disorders, that are  educational and inspiring, so our audience can feel empowered to take control of their lives, find the support they need and move forward with hope.

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OUR STORY

Founded by Michael Ortoll in 2021, his daughter, Christine, battled substance use disorder and mental health issues for ten years. During this time Michael and his family left no stone unturned as they fought alongside Christine, turning to over 20 recovery centers and countless experts for help along the way.

She achieved sobriety for nearly three years, until her final relapse and resulting death via synthetic opioid overdose. It was Christine’s wish in her own words:

“I do not want to be defined by my disease but remembered for helping those with it”.

Our Vison
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OUR VISION

To transform the lives of those affected by mental illness and substance abuse so they can seek recovery and thrive.

Initiatives
OUR MEDIA

Our feature documentary, called “One Second at a Time: Battling the Monster of Addiction" shares Christine Ortoll's struggle for recovery, told from her own journals, treatment experts, family and friends.

 

To date, our film has earned over forty five film festival awards and has made a big impact in helping those who suffer from substance abuse, &/or mental illness, and their loved ones.

This will be available on major streaming platforms in Q2 of 2024.

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OUR INITIATIVES
1. SECONDARY SCHOOLS

When Christine graduated high school in 2012, college recovery programs did not exist. 

Per the latest research appx 24% of all college students meet the definition of susbatnce abuse, yet less than 5% of all colleges have an effective recovery program in place.

 "Safety Net: Helping College Students in Recovery Thrive " is a showcase of the successful college recovery community we helped build, at my alma mater, Florida State University (FSU) so we can allow our future leaders to achieve their dreams and make this world a better place. 

Our college recovery community at FSU is called LIFT (Living Intentionally, Finding Togetherness).

In our first year, LIFT engaged with over 1,000 students. Research shows students that participate in college recovery are more apt to have higher graduation rates, higher GPAs, are less likely to relapse and have a greater likelihood of continuing to thrive in society.


Our charity's national initiative is to make this a reality at every college campus in the US.


We will be sharing this with every higher education institution in March 2024.
 

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2. PRIMARY SCHOOLS

In early childhood we need to better inform parents, teachers, and pediatricians, on the causes of childhood trauma, so we can help prevent chronic diseases, such as addiction and raise children which are emotionally, mentally and physically healthy.

 

Adverse Childhood Experiences are traumatic events that occur during childhood. They have lasting, negative effects on health, well-being, and opportunity.

According to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), ACEs are linked to chronic health problems, mental illness, and substance misuse in adulthood.”

 

The problem is most people are unaware of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and how they lead to toxic stress and lifelong problems with wellness, and learning.

 

Over 2/3 of all children in the US are affected by ACEs and 1 out of 8 adults has 4 or more ACEs. This issue is embedded in our society and unfortunately worsening.  As the number of ACEs increases, so does the risk for negative health outcomes, both physical and psychological.

Our aim is to educate parents, teachers and children so we can deal with these in a healthy way early, since the leading two are divorce and economic hardship which impact over half of all children in the US.

A PERSON WITH 4
OR MORE ACE's IS

2.4x

More likely to have a stroke.

1.9x

More likely to have cancer.

12x

More likely to attempt suicide.

7x

More likely to be an alcoholic.

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3. REFORMING ADDICTION TREATMENT

Substance abuse is a major public health crisis in the United States as its economic burden is greater than $ 1.5 Trillion annual per JEC report. More than 23 million battle the disease of addiction, yet only 1 in 10 who need it receive effective treatment, due to: the high cost, stigma, and lack of access.

Reforming addiction treatment is the most effective way to address the problem. We must increase affordability, and access to quality, evidence-based treatment programs such as Medications for Addiction Treatment (MAT), counseling, therapy, and support networks, including in rural areas which lack crucial resources.

We need to increase harm reduction on services, such as naloxone, syringe services programs and fentanyl test strips to save lives. It is also important to provide access to housing and employment assistance, as well as other social services to those who suffer from substance abuse and mental illness.

It is key we focus on prevention and early intervention strategies since our current healthcare model focuses mainly on treatment.

 

Prevention efforts can include education and outreach programs that provide information on the risks of drug use and how to access help if someone is struggling with an addiction.

 

Early intervention strategies should make all medical visits screen for substance use disorder, so we can quickly connect those in need of treatment services with appropriate resources or referrals for treatment. In addition, all treatment should be customized for individual needs and include coordinated care for other illnesses, such as mental or physical disorders.

 

Addiction treatment reform is a multifaceted and demanding process.

To successfully improve the current landscape of addiction care, there are many stakeholders who need to be involved.

 

The stakeholders include educators, parents/families, healthcare providers, government agencies, businesses, and advocacy groups such as non-profits.

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Facts

FACTS

Drug Overdose
is the
Leading Cause of Death

for
18
to 45
Year Olds.

Synthetic opiods account for 2/3 of all overdose fatalities.

* Source: NIDA

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1 of 2

People know

someone who suffers from substance use disorder.

23 million Americans suffer from substance use disorder (SUD), yet less than 10% of them receive help due to its stigma, cost, and finding appropriate treatment for their disease.

Per research, each one of them affects an average of 7 family members and close friends, which means that one of every two of us knows someone who suffers from SUD.

*Source: SAMHSA & PEW GROUP

70%

Of all pills confiscated by the DEA in 2022 had a lethal dose of synthetic opioids; which are now in all drugs and 50-100 times stronger than ever. Its newer versions are more fatal.

* Source: DEA

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Doctors and nurse practitioners receive appropriate addiction education. We need better training, beginning with pediatricians so we can treat mental health issues early.

*Source: AMA 

1 in 4

Of all addictions start in adolescence. Teens who learn the risks of drugs from parents are 50% less likely to use drugs..

*Source: SAMHSA & NIH

90%

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 MANY TEENS & YOUNG ADULTS

Buy drugs online via social media apps.

*Source: DEA & NIH

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Donate

The Christine Ortoll Charity is committed to creating media about mental health issues and substance use disorder, that is both educational and inspiring, so the audience can feel empowered to take control of their own lives, find the support they need, and move forward with hope.

Donors
DONORS

MIKE ORTOLL FAMILY

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JOIN OUR MAILING LIST

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